New Glasses Giving You Double Vision? Here’s What To Do

It’s a dreaded moment. Especially if you are just getting prescription glasses  for the first time in your life, you are nervous enough as it is to put them on for the first time and see what happens. So when your new glasses give you double vision, your worst nightmares come true.

Fortunately, even when that happens, not all is lost. Double vision can come from a variety of sources, and not all of them are as bad as you think. Keep reading to find out what to do, and why you may not need to overreact.

Why Double Vision Happens

Double vision, or diplopia, is actually a medical condition that can affect your eye sight. For a variety of possible reasons, you perceive a single object multiple times, significantly distracting and inhibiting your ability to see clearly.

It can occur if your eyes do not work together properly (also known as binocular double vision), monocular double vision (when one of your eyes doesn’t function properly), or physiological double vision, which can occur with background objects and is usually corrected automatically.

Getting new glasses can simulate either of these conditions. Even though you may not suffer from double vision, the new sensation of seeing the world through a lens can confuse your brain to the point of simulating the condition, forcing you to see double.

What it Means (And Doesn’t Mean)

Because it is a simple result of your brain adjusting to the new lens, double vision connected to prescription glasses is actually more common than you think. In most cases, it is not a cause for concern: your eyes and brain simply need to adjust to this new experience, and once they do, the double vision will go away.

Of course, that is not always the case. The alternative is that your prescription was not quite right, in which case the double vision will not go away until you get different lenses. This is especially common when your individual subscriptions for your left and right eye differ to a greater degree than they should, resulting in simulated binocular double vision.

What You Should Do Next

The first step is easy: don’t panic, and simply wait out the adjustment period. In most cases, your double vision will begin to reduce and eventually go away after a couple of weeks of adjustment.

If, however, your eyes have not adjusted after a month, it’s time to take action. Get your eyes re-checked to see whether your prescription is right. If it is, get a second opinion to see if anything changes. If, after these checks, your prescription still does not change, consult with your eye doctor for further steps.

They key though, still, remains not to panic. Double vision induced by your new glasses is nothing that will permanently damage your eye sight. Even having to make adjustments, in the end, is not a problem – but you do want to make sure that your prescription is right to optimize your vision.

In short, double vision for new glasses is often not as tragic as it initially occurs. Of course, you still want to be sure that you take care of the problem, getting your prescription just right. Your glasses are a major addition to your life, after all, as you will likely wear them for the majority of your day. Double vision is never fun, and if it persists, you should ensure that you get glasses that match perfectly with your needs.

And once that’s taken care of, it’s time to find glasses that make you look as good as your vision! Once you’re ready for that step, contact us. You will be impressed by our wide selection of glasses, helping you look great and feel great at the same time.

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