Are Oakley Sunglasses ANSI Approved?

ANSI, or the American National Standard Institute, is a private, non-profit organization first established (as the American Engineering Standards Committee) in 1918.

Are Oakley Sunglasses ANSI Approved?

Are Oakley Sunglasses ANSI Approved?ANSI sets specific standards for evaluating eyewear factors such as impact resistance, lens thickness, projectile penetration, and optical quality. Because of this, ANSI ratings have become the safety eyewear industry standard.

Almost all models of Oakley sunglasses meet or exceed the ANSI Z87.1 standard for optical clarity and impact resistance. To be sure your particular model complies, check the product description for exact specifications. Just be aware that although Oakleys are designed to ANSI Z87.1 requirements (or better), they are not officially rated for OSHA standards.

OSHA, or the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, is an agency of the U.S. Department of Labor. OSHA stipulates Federally-regulated requirements to which employers must comply in order to legally protect the vision safety of their employees. These standards obligate employers to enforce the uses of appropriate eye or face protection when employees are exposed to hazardous materials, liquids, vapors, chemicals, or other harmful substances. OSHA standards provide specific requirements of such protection allowed in the workplace.

However, any ANSI-compliant Oakley sunglasses will also comply with OSHA requirements, since OSHA claims ANSI Z87.1 as the benchmark standard for occupational eye and face protection. One of OSHA’s declarative sections states the following:

“Protective eye and face devices purchased after July 5, 1994, shall comply with ANSI Z87.1-1989, ‘American National Standard Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection,’ which is incorporated by reference as specified in Sec. 1910.6.www.osha.gov ANSI Z87.1.”

Shop Oakley SunglassesIn plain English, this means that the ANSI standard has been deemed by OSHA to be the higher one, and the one to which OSHA must comply. So although Oakley sunglasses do not carry any specific OSHA ratings, any ANSI-rated Oakley models will meet the OSHA requirement. If you’re considering Oakley sunglasses for on-the-job safety use, be sure to research the ANSI rating of your specific model. There’s a good chance that your Oakleys already comply, but you or your employer are obligated to confirm the safety rating before approval can be granted.

5 Responses to Are Oakley Sunglasses ANSI Approved?
  1. Mitch
    April 29, 2014 | 5:20 pm

    In order to comply with OSHA’s Eye and Face Protection standards safety glasses must meet ANSI Z87 standards. ANSI Z87.1 standards state that there must be a “Z87″ marking on the eyeware (more detailed below). If it is not marked it does not actually meet the standard even if it has been designed and tested against those requirements.

    In plain English, if your eyeglasses do not have the “Z87″ marking, your company should not allow you to wear them if they are intended to function as safety glasses. It is too big of a liability.

    I know the Industrial M Frame has the marking and I’ve seen at least one other pair that has the marking. I believe it is a Standard Issue pair but don’t have the specs.

    ANSI Z87.1 Markings

    ANSI Z87.1-1989: Each lens must be distinctly marked with the manufacturer’s monogram. In addition, if applicable the lens must be marked with the appropriate shade and special purpose designation. All major spectacle components (front with bridge area, lens or lenses, temples and sideshields) except the lens or lenses, and all major goggle components must have a trademark identifying the manufacturer and must be marked “Z87″ to indicate compliance with the standard.

    ANSI Z87.1-2003: Two levels of protection are described – basic and high impact. Removable lenses must be marked with the manufacturer’s monogram and basic impact lenses require no additional mark, but high impact lenses require a “+”. Non-removable lenses must be marked with the manufacturer’s monogram and basic impact lenses must be marked “Z87″ and high impact lenses must be marked “Z87+”. If applicable the lenses must be marked with the appropriate shade and special purpose designation. Spectacles front, at least one temple and removable sideshields and goggles frame and lens housing or carrier must be marked with the manufacturer’s monogram and “Z87 or Z87+”. Non-removable lens products require only one marking – for spectacles the marking may be placed on the frame or temples and for goggles the marking may be applied to any component including the lens.

    ANSI Z87.1-2010: Products are either non-impact or impact protectors. In addition to the manufacturer’s monogram, Z87 marking and impact marking, manufacturers must add lens type (welding, UV filter, visible light filter, IR filter, variable tint and special purpose) and use (protection against splash droplet, dust and fine dust) markings when claims of impact rating, specific lens type and/or use are made.

    • Kieran Hunt
      May 6, 2014 | 1:39 pm

      Hi Mitch,

      You’re correct and make a good point. It’s important for anyone interested in purchasing a pair of Oakleys as safety glasses to make sure that they carry the Z87 marking. Most Oakleys DO NOT carry this marking, but some do.

      Thanks for your thoughtful and thorough contribution, and I hope you visit our blog again!

      Best,
      Kieran Hunt
      MyEyewear2Go.com

  2. MR
    June 17, 2014 | 9:13 pm

    I heard from Oakley that with a prescription, the glasses are no longer ANSI rated (i.e. the ballistic M frame, or standard M frame).

    • Kieran Hunt
      June 25, 2014 | 1:21 pm

      Hi MR,

      This is likely to be true because of the way that Oakley inserts the prescription lenses into those frames. Good point, and thanks for your contribution!

      Thanks,
      Kieran Hunt
      MyEyewear2Go.com

  3. Jonathan Jacobs
    January 20, 2015 | 8:32 pm

    (b) Criteria for protective eye and face
    protection. (1) Protective eye and face
    protection devices must comply with
    any of the following consensus standards:
    (i) ANSI Z87.1–2003, ‘‘American National
    Standard Practice for Occupational
    and Educational Eye and Face
    Protection,’’ which is incorporated by
    reference in § 1910.6;
    (ii) ANSI Z87.1–1989 (R–1998), ‘‘American
    National Standard Practice for
    Occupational and Educational Eye and
    Face Protection,’’ which is incorporated
    by reference in § 1910.6; or
    (iii) ANSI Z87.1–1989, ‘‘American National
    Standard Practice for Occupational
    and Educational Eye and Face
    Protection,’’ which is incorporated by
    reference in § 1910.6.
    (2) Protective eye and face protection
    devices that the employer demonstrates
    are at least as effective as
    protective eye and face protection devices
    that are constructed in accordance
    with one of the above consensus
    standards will be deemed to be in compliance
    with the requirements of this
    section.

    To me, this section indicates that if you can prove glasses perform to the ANSI standard, then you are in compliance. What are your thoughts?

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